Center for Holocaust Survivors - Cincinnati...

Jewish Family Service provides Holocaust survivors with case management; home visits; restitution assistance; counseling and referral; social therapeutic activities; free hearing tests; and safety/adaptive equipment.

 

A recent review of this program has shown that Holocaust survivors who have received care management services and participated in the programs offered by the Center for Holocaust Survivors have enjoyed a better quality of life, including timely attention to their healthcare needs, emotional support and encouragement to engage in life review and other counseling to help them deal with loss and memories of trauma.

 

Jewish Family Service programs and services for Holocaust survivors and older adults receive additional funding from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, The Jewish Foundation of Greater Cincinnati, United Way of Greater Cincinnati, Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio, and The Bahmann Foundation. It is a member agency of the Association of Jewish Family & Children’s Agencies.

Friendship Club Hanukkah Party December 2016

Tech grant in action connects Zarya with family and friends

Zarya Keller, 81, is staying connected to family and friends in Cincinnati and around the world thanks to a new iPad tablet she received from Jewish Family Service. Her tablet was purchased through a technology grant Jewish Family Service received from the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA).

 

The $60,000 grant was awarded to help Cincinnati’s Jewish Holocaust survivors reduce isolation by staying connected to community. Jewish Family Service Cincinnati was one of only 23 organizations to receive this funding through the JFNA’s Center for Advancing Holocaust Survivor Care.

 

“Zarya no longer drives, which creates isolation. Phone calls of course helped her stay in touch with others, but being able to communicate visually through video chat on her iPad greatly enhanced the personal experience. Seeing the faces and smiles of family and friends is making her happier,” said Elena Itenberg, Technology Program Specialist with Jewish Family Service Center for Holocaust Survivors.

 

Volunteers worked closely with the first group of ten survivors who received the iPads to help them feel comfortable with the technology that was very new to them.  With the training, Zarya has been using Skype on her tablet to video chat with friends in Cincinnati, her daughter who lives out of state, and family and friends in Israel.

 

All participants in this program have reported an increased level of happiness when a survey was taken after a month of tablet use.  The survey also showed that the ten participants more than doubled their hours communicating with family and friends. In addition to using video chat, the tablets let them connect with others through email. Only three participants had ever used email prior to receiving the iPads, two of which had sent just one email each. Afterward, however, email was frequently used by all participants.

  

Jewish Family Service’s Tablets and Technology: Alleviating Isolation in Holocaust Survivors program is now training a second group so they too can stay connected to the community and reap the benefits of this initiative.

 

Jewish Family Service programs and services for Holocaust survivors and older adults receive additional funding from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, The Jewish Foundation of Greater Cincinnati, United Way of Greater Cincinnati, Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio, and The Bahmann Foundation. It is a member agency of the Association of Jewish Family & Children’s Agencies.

 

For more information, contact Jewish Family Service at 513-469-1188.

 

 

Tech Grant helps Holocaust Survivors

Cincinnati’s Jewish Holocaust survivors will receive groundbreaking care to reduce isolation thanks to a $60,000 grant Jewish Family Service Cincinnati received from the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA). When combined with matching funds, this award will enable $80,000 in new programming for survivors. 

 

Jewish Family Service Cincinnati is one of only 23 organizations to receive this funding through the JFNA’s Center for Advancing Holocaust Survivor Care, which was recently launched following an award from the United States Department of Health and Human Services for up to $12 million over 5 years to advance innovations in person-centered, trauma-informed services for Holocaust survivors in the United States.

 

These grants mark the first time in history that the United States federal government has provided direct funding for Holocaust survivor services. Of the more than 100,000 Holocaust survivors in the United States, nearly one quarter are aged eighty-five or older, and one in four lives in poverty. Many live alone and are at risk for social isolation, depression, and other physical and mental health conditions stemming from periods of starvation, disease and torture in their youth.

 

Person-centered, trauma-informed services (PCTI) care is a holistic approach to service provision that promotes the dignity, strength, and empowerment of trauma victims by incorporating knowledge about the role of trauma in victims' lives into agency programs, policies and procedures.

 

Jewish Family Service Cincinnati will use the grant to teach Russian- and English-speaking Holocaust survivors, many of whom live below 150% of the federal poverty line, how to use a variety of tablet-based programs to stay connected to friends and family.

 

“Jewish Family Service will draw on its knowledge and history of providing PCTI care to pilot and implement its program, Tablets and Technology: Alleviating Isolation in Holocaust Survivors,” says Gail Ziegler, LISW-S, Senior Manager of Jewish Family Service’s Center for Holocaust Survivors. “Our trauma-informed program will ensure that survivors stay connected to the community, while also respecting their need for independence by teaching them how to communicate and interact with the world electronically.”

 

The Center for Advancing Holocaust Survivor Care promotes these innovative service delivery models together with the expertise of partner organizations including the Association of Jewish Family & Children's Agencies and the Claims Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany.  The grant money is a combination of federal dollars and philanthropic dollars raised by Jewish Federations as part of JFNA's National Holocaust Survivor Initiative, which seeks to raise $45 million to support the Survivor community.

 

Jewish Family Service programs and services for Holocaust survivors and older adults receive additional funding from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, The Jewish Foundation of Greater Cincinnati, United Way of Greater Cincinnati, Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio, and The Bahmann Foundation. It is a member agency of the Association of Jewish Family & Children’s Agencies.

 

For more information, contact Jewish Family Service at 513-469-1188.

 

 

New Car helps Holocaust Survivors

With the support of generous donors, a new car was purchased that will be used primarily by Action Reconciliation Service for Peace volunteers from Germany who work for a year at Jewish Family Service Center for Holocaust Survivors to help deliver services for local survivors. Learn more

Negotiations with German Government Led to Sizeable Funding Increase Worldwide

AID TO HOLOCAUST VICTIMS IN CINCINNATI TO MORE THAN DOUBLE IN 2015

Elderly Jewish Holocaust victims in the Cincinnati area, the last of their generation to have endured the horrors of the Nazi genocide, will receive significantly more aid in 2015, announced Julius Berman, President of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference).

 

In 2015, the Claims Conference allocation to Jewish Family Service of Greater Cincinnati will be $1.2 million, an increase of about $718,000 (145 percent) over 2014 funding, with most of the increase earmarked for homecare, the top social welfare priority for these survivors. Learn more.

 

Friendship Club Hanukkah Party 2015 - photos

Victory Day 2015 - photos

Friendship Club Hanukkah Party 2014 - photos

Smiling guests celebrated Hanukkah December 18, 2014 when Jewish Family Service Center for Holocaust Survivors organized the annual luncheon at Adath Israel Congregation. In the company of close friends, participants enjoyed live music, dancing, a raffle, and a buffet lunch. Holocaust Survivor Ruth Levine and her daughter Sandy Levine lit the Hanukkah candles with Gail Ziegler, Senior Manager of the Center for Holocaust Survivors. The celebration was one of many activities offered by the Friendship Club to survivors in the Cincinnati area. The Friendship Club meets regularly and is open to all Jewish Holocaust Survivors. The Hanukkah party was made possible by a grant from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims, Inc.

Friendship Club - Creating Planters March 27, 2014

Friendship Club Hanukkah Party 2013 photos

New Voices: A collaborative photography program

  Please click on the arrow below to view the presentation.

In the Spring of 2013, students from Cincinnati Sycamore High School met with members of the Holocaust Survivor’s group run by Jewish Family Service of Cincinnati to reflect on life in images and words.

 

The group produced images on a weekly basis using a variety of experiments including photography shadows, passageways, working with natural and artificial lighting and trying different ways of framing subjects. Subject matter was drawn from an array of daily experience including, home, family, friends, events, shopping trips and a few more daring adventures.

 

Images were shared on a weekly basis and conversations about issues such as national identity, generations and personal experience were recorded. The program culminated with each participant creating portraits of the other members of their small group.

 

The exhibit includes select images and transcripts of the recordings produced during the program. The final collection of work reflects the shared wisdom and experience of each of the two very different generations participating in this project. It underlines not only the need to preserve the unique perspectives of those who persevered one of the cruelest episodes in history, but also the need to share this experience with younger generations.

 

Thank you to David Rosenthal and Prairie Inc. for leading this program. And thank you also to Paul Bochtler, Jewish Family Service’s ARSP volunteer from Germany, who first had the vision and determination to put cameras into the hands of Holocaust Survivors as a way to encourage conversation and socialization…which led to his connecting with David.

 


News releases about ways JFS strengthens the lives of Holocaust survivors

 

   

Older Adult Services receives funds administered by Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio

Social services for Nazi victims have been supported by a grant from the
Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany.

 

Funds are received from The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany for the Emergency Assistance Program for Nazi Victims at the direction of the United States District Court supervising the lawsuit In Re: Holocaust Victim Assets Litigation (Swiss Banks).

 

Assistive listening devices/adaptive equipment is provided by
a grant from The Bahmann Foundation. 

Share